Bistis, Leonidas M.

He had been born about 1881 in Greece and in 1915 lived in Pireus, Greece. His body was identified after the sinking, No. 251. He was buried at Killury Churchyard, near Tralee, 10 July 1915.

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Jung, Philippe Joseph

Philippe Joseph Young: he was a wool merchant, residing in Canada, but was a native of Antwerp, Belgium (born 12 December 1882). He was married to Minnie and had children. He also had a brother, Antoine. During WWI, he had fled to Vlijmen, Netherlands. In 1945, he was listed as a wool exporter. He had observed the approaching torpedo and had run down to his cabin, where he got some important papers, but forgot his life preserver. When he came on deck, he noticed a lifeboat that capsized and made the decision to jump into the sea instead of trying another lifeboat. He was picked by a lifeboat (?) after having drifted about for two hours. (geschiednisvanantwerpen.be)

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Young, Mrs. Georgina Abigail

Georgina Abigail Vernon Young: She was the wife of the above. Her parents may have been Dr. Elias (born 1827 in Ontario) and Abigail (nee Willoughby; born about 1834 in Cornwall, England) Vernon. She had at least two siblings; Walter Elias, b. 1863, and Clarinda Ella, b. 1861. Her mother was still alive as of 1945. Her body was recovered and identified after the sinking (No. 159) and was handed over to C. P. R., 21 May.

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Young, James Mason

James Mason Young: He had been born 23 June 1855 in Hamilton, Ontario, and had co-founded the Hamilton Cotton Company in 1882 and was its president. He had married Georgina Abigail Vernon and they had at least four children: Elsie Georgina (5 July 1883), Kathleen Douglass (9 October 1881), Alan Vernon (1886) and James Vernon Young. They had booked passage on the Lusitania to visit a son who had been wounded in the war. They belonged to the Presbyterian Church.

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Wright, Walter

Walter Wright: he was born in Scotland and in 1915 lived in Coventry, England. He was the managing director of (the wheel department) at the Dunlop Rim and Wheel Company, Limited. He had been in the USA on a business trip for the firm. In 1915, he lived at Stoke Park, Coventry, England. He was married to Janet Gourlie Wright, to whom he left property valued at $3,788.18s. 

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Wright, Robert Currie

Robert Currie Wright. He lived at 985 East Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio and was a former county auditor; he started this position in 1902 and served for seven years. He was on his way to Scotland, his old homeland, and expected to stay during the summer. He had been born 30 April 1861 at Motherwell, Dalziel, Lanark, Scotland, to Robert L. and Jessie (nee Currie) Wright, who had married 7 December 1855 at Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Scotland. He had become a naturalized citizen of the USA in 1886. He measured 5’8 ½”, had brown eyes, wore a moustache, had grey hair, a ruddy complexion, and a round face. It is likely he had married Sarah J. Wright and they had at least three daughters; Helen L., Alice F., and Norma, who all were born in Ohio. He was alive as of 1932 and very likely in 1940.

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”Robert C. Wright, a prominent politician of Cleveland was still visibly affected by his experience. He said: ‘I was on dock (sic) close by the lounge on the starboard side reading a novel when I heard the crash and saw the upheaval of water. Suddenlly the vessel began to list to starboard. I said to myself: ‘This isn’t serious but it is best to be prepared.’ I started to go below for a life belt when I changed my mind about the seriousness of the situation and thought it best not to go. Then confidence returned to me as the stewards went calmly about the deck shouting: ‘There is no danger.’
The people already were crowding into the boat when suddenly the vessel gave a tremendous lurch and I, too, was precipitated into the boat. A woman in the water cried: Help me,’ and I reached out my hands to do so, when suddenly it seemed to me as if the end of the world had come. There was a crash, a great upheaval and my ears were dinned by a great concussion. Then the water began to boil up all about and I could see that the boat and all in it had disappeared and I was swimming. Some distance away was a fishing boat. She made several tacks but never came any nearer. I knew that it was on account of no wind but I was annoyed. There was no panic on board the Lusitania but there was an awful lack of efficiency. The boats were not lowered properly. Some were chopped from the ropes, fell and overturned. So far as I can recall, it was just lack of efficiency. I don’t know who was saved, but I know that Elbert Hubbard must have been drowned. I saw him and his wife start below, apparently for life belts, but I never saw either again. I am certain they were drowned.” (Eau Claire Leader, 11 May 1915, p. 2) 

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Wood, Arthur John

Arthur John Wood. His birth was registered in the second quarter of 1876 in Wolstanton, Staffordshire, and he had been christened on 28 February 1877 in Wolstanton. His parents were Herbert Henry, an engraver born about 1852 in Staffordshire, and Mary Ann (nee Hall; she had been born about 1855 in Staffordshire) Wood who had married in the third quarter of 1875 in Wolstanton. In 1891, he was listed as an engraver, living with his parents at 48 (?) Scotia Road in Burslem, Staffordshire. There were three sisters living in the household at the time; Eleanor, 13, Laura, 6, and Evelyn, 2. Arthur was listed as a ‘potters designers and engraver (or engineer)’ in the 1901 census, living at King William Street in Tunstall, Staffordshire, having been born in Wolstanton, aged 24. He was married to Sarah Alice (nee) Farrall Wood, 22.They had married 26 December 1900 in Wolstanton. The Staffordshire Adviser of 29 May 1915 carried a death announcement where it was stated that his parents were Herbert Henry and Mary Ann Wood and that Arthur John Wood lived in Oldcott Green. His parents resided at 48 Scotia Road in Burslem at the time. His father died 22 December 1926, aged 74, and his mother passed away 19 December 1939 (the year is difficult to decipher, it could read 1935), in her 81st year. Arthur is mentioned on their gravestone. In 1915, he lived at 59 Oldcott Green in Goldenhill, Staffordshire. He left £5,722.9s.11d to Sarah Alice Wood, widow. His body was recovered and identified after the mishap (No. 126) He was buried at Queenstown on 10 May; Grave C, 4th Row, Lower Tier.

The material presented on this page has been researched by Peter Engberg-Klarström. Copyright 2017 Peter Engberg-Klarström.
Feel free to use the research, but please refer to my research if used in publications or if published or posted on other pages on the Internet